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20130115
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CNBC 4
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CNBC
Jan 15, 2013 6:00am EST
'd never use the debt ceiling to negotiate. there's been three or four deficit deals reached during debt ceiling negotiations. that's what they've been used for in the past. in fact, you voted no on raising the debt ceiling in 2006, and some other things. and then to see him actually, he looked shocked that his loyal cadre of acolytes that someone would actually broach the subject that, you know, that he actually had a tough time answering. >> i think it shows the position he's in, though. he gets attacked from the right and the left. >> he doesn't get attack. the questions i want asked are never asked of him anywhere. >> he should come on "squawk." >> that's not going to happen. >> i'll get out. is that possible? >> no. >> i had a story but we'll talk about that one later. >> what's your story? >> we'll do it later in the broadcast. >> about nerds? >> what else would it be about? you want me to talk to here? i'm going to talk to here. coming up this morning's top stories, plus we're going to hop behind the wheel with nissan ceo carlos ghosn at the detroit auto show. first check this out
CNBC
Jan 16, 2013 6:00am EST
in an administration, did any of the deficit deals that we did, were those occurring at the same time as debt ceiling raises? >> they all do. >> we've heard that that -- i'm not going to accept that, not going to do it, not the way it's done. we're not a banana republic. how many can you recall, deficit deals were affected? it's something that's done, is it not? >> standard operating procedure. we all learned about the power of the purse of democracy. back then, it used to be taxes because they couldn't borrow. now, you can borrow. taxes aren't the only strains what government can spend. the parliament and congress has to be able to control the borrowing level. that's government 101. >> is zit in g-- dis in geingeny we've already been to the restaurant and trying to stiff the bill? it wasn't the $800 stimulus or any of the things the president's done, it's congress? >> first, you're raising debt limits to cover future spending. fact one is the money hasn't been spent yet. that's not true. >> it's sort of disassembling. >> that's a good word for it. the second fact is congress hasn't approved the mone
CNBC
Jan 22, 2013 6:00am EST
when you're running a merchandise trade deficits and current account deficits. these are the things that really matter. and they're just kind of big macros. so they divide them down to a single session or a quick abrupt move. but they're the real flows in the global economy that are going to matter going forward. >> yeah, all right. i'm staying long. i'm staying long, kevin. >> well, we think last year we gave it a bite on the cheek. but that's going to be a lot harder this year, joe. and one of the things you're pointing out are extremely high gdp. and so the big thing this year is to make the switch. the customers are now the employees. the employees are the future customers. so you've got to keep the growth and accelerate the growth in employment over the 1.25/1.50 that we're doing if we're going to keep the equity market going in the direction that it has been for the past two years. >> all right, kevin ferry. thank you. >> is that a phone ringing down there, kevin? >> yeah. someone is trying to get to their broker. >> it would ring and ring and ring. >> that must drive you craz
CNBC
Jan 18, 2013 6:00am EST
. germany's problem is the reverse. it's been running a huge surplus which is the deficit of the other countries of europe that they cannot finance. >> correct. >> that is the essence of the european crisis. >> but in a global environment -- >> the whole question with respect to the u.s. is whether we can sustain our current account relationship with the rest of the world. and particularly with china. and that's a decision that the rest of the world will make. it's completely -- >> james, are we -- we added a new entitlement, obama care, which some, i don't know what that's going to cost. there's some groups, i guess they would call them, if they're too conservative, but trillions and trillions of dollars of additional entitlements that we've just layered over the entitlements we already have. are we at the right level now? is this the perfect level of promises we've made? or would you even go above where we are right now? >> well, i think the problem that we have is that our health care sector is bloated by this enormous private insurance system that we have. this sort of mixed bag of
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4